GV Hawaii Adrift

Imagery and Language: Learning English; Adrift in Hawaii

Archive for the ‘Hawaiian Culture’ Category

Strange things seen in America.

Posted by joegre on November 23, 2008

This time I’d like to mention a few things that I’ve seen in this country which made me curious.

First of all I’d like to mention the cars here. I’ve heard that you get a fine if somebody in your car has no belt on, but it’s legal to carry peoples on the loading platform of your pickup on the Highway. Strange country.

But some stuff is really nice too. I like the ”rescue” surfboards of the lifeguards here. imgp1312I like the though that they rescue surfers with a surfboard; it’s somehow more organic then with a jet boat. So I see that it makes sense that lifeguards have surfboards. But what the hack do the firefighters have surfboards for? This looks like a joke:foto-0092So the local firefighters get the second place for being somewhat weird. But the first place belongs to something else: I mean I know this is a different country with a rich culture which might look strange to me. And I also know that fast food is an important part of the American Way of Life. BUT: Have you ever seen the haul down the flag ceremony at Burger King? It takes place every day at 6:15 p.m. Don’t believe it? Go to see it!imgp1321

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Maui: Getting Our Bearings

Posted by Josh on November 3, 2008

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Grand Wailea Resort: Maui

Posted by Josh on November 3, 2008

This is the Hotel I had my honeymoon at for 2 weeks!

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Hanauma Bay, Montse’s favorite place

Posted by gvcholita on October 29, 2008

My favorite place in Oahu is Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve that is meant to be the Sanctuary for whales.

It is about 10 miles east of Waikiki just off the main coastal road and it is beautiful, it has a very clear water different deep blue tones, white sand and no rocks! that I think that is the best for me, I do not like Waikiki beaches because they have rocky sands and when you go in the water you are actually stepping on rocks. That is an important reason for me to have chosen Hanauma Bay as my favorite place around the island of Oahu.

I love Hanauma Bay because it has a beautiful landscape, I think the nicest view, you can even see the tip of  an archipelago far away. The sunset is beautiful, you can see a rainbow, the sky seems to be painted in different colors and the sun hiding underneath the ocean.

I think Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve is very nice too because during winter is the home for whales and seas and you are able to see them there, not to dive with them because they are not near from the shore or the beach they are a bit far away but you can get to see them, and take some nice pictures it seems like if you are in Paradise lots of differnt fish species among many other sea animals that you can see while you take a snorkel tour, that I highly recommend!

I love Hanauma bay, I really think everybody will like it as well.

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Local Culture

Posted by Josh on October 28, 2008

Local Culture
Thanks to its convenient position in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, not to mention its tropical beauty, Hawaii has attracted people from a vast array of ethnic backgrounds. This has earned its moniker as “the melting pot of the Pacific,” merging the kama’aina into their own unique culture.

One of the first things newcomers notice is the way locals speak – their inflections and their slang. Many locals speak pidgin, a special dialect that originated in the old plantations blending Chinese, Japanese, Hawaiian, Portuguese, Filipino and English words into a new concoction of colloquialisms.

Pidgin is more than just words; it’s a relaxed way of talking. The first step to understanding pidgin’s vocabulary and how to use it, however, can be learned through books such as Pidgin to Da Max or the Da Kine Dictionary. Online instruction is also available through Web sites like http://www.extreme-hawaii.com/pidgin.

In addition to dialect, locals have a different way of giving directions. Instead of using north, south, east, and west, expect to receive (and give) location advice using mauka (toward the mountains), makai (toward the ocean), Ewa (west) and Diamond Head (east).

Local CultureWhen driving, giving and receiving the aloha spirit is always appreciated. It’s been noted that Hawaii drivers tend to let others merge into their lanes easily, and drive at a more relaxed pace than the mainland. Allowing pedestrians to cross the street completely before you make a turn, however, is not just being courteous – it’s the law.

One very important custom is to remove your footwear before entering someone’s home. Usually at parties you will see a myriad of shoes, sandals, and slippers strewn outside the door; follow suit and you will fit in perfectly. (By the way, they are called “slippers,” not flip flops or thongs.)

On that note: whenever you attend a party at someone’s home, especially a pot luck, don’t show up empty handed. If it’s not a pot luck, a form of food or drink for the host is always offered, even if it is not something they will consume at the party.

Everyone loves celebrations, but in Hawaii they go off with a bang. Chinese New Year, birthday parties, grand openings, the Fourth of July and especially New Year’s Eve spur strings of firecrackers – provided, of course, you have a permit. The idea behind firecrackers is to scare off any evil spirits so that you can be assured of good luck for your home or business for the coming year.

Speaking of spirits, don’t be alarmed if people speak of the supernatural and paranormal in casual terms. Local folklore, ancient myth, and cultural superstitions also bring Hawaii people together through common understanding. Don’t take lava rocks home; avert your eyes if you see a procession of drums and torches coming from the mountains; don’t stand your chopsticks in your rice, and always keep some Hawaiian salt in the house – not just for cooking, but to help with any metaphysical needs as well.

The most important thing to remember: relax, you’re in Hawaii. Share your customs with your neighbors as they share them with you, and you just may start a new tradition.

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Dusk in Waikiki

Posted by Josh on October 22, 2008

Dusk

Dusk

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Pidgin – Hawaii’s Third Language

Posted by Josh on October 22, 2008

Da Jesus Book

Pidgin is the Hawaiian English and it sounds like that – Eh, howzit? Wassamattah you? Cannah talk da kine? (Hey, how’s it going? What’s the matter? Can’t you speak Pidgin?). You won’t hear this type of talk anywhere else in the world but in Hawaii. That’s why Pidgin is also considered a local attraction, so to say. If you are native English speaker you will still get the meaning, but if you’re not it may be difficult to understand.

In fact, Pidgin has its own vocabulary and grammar. In the bookstores you can even find and buy a Pidgin dictionary and a Bible called “Da Jesus Book,” which is fully written in Pidgin.

Pidgin originates from the plantation workers, who came to Hawaii in the 19th century. Pidgin has some Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese and even other influences.

Some Common Pidgin Words and Phrases

Brah / bruddah: brother or pal. Most men refer
to each other this way.
Broke da mout: delicious
Bumbucha: very big Chicken skin: goose bumps
Fo’ what: why Fo’ real: really
Garans: guaranteed Grind: to eat
Hana hou: one more time Hele on: let’s go, get moving
Howzit: How are you? Huhu: mad, angry
Keiki: child Kokua: care, help
Like beef?: want to fight? Lolo: dumb, crazy
Lua: bathroom Moke: big, tough local
Nevah: never Ono: delicious
Pau: finished, done Pupus: appetizers
Spahk: check it out Stink Eye: a very dirty look
Talk stink: badmouth someone Tita: a very tough girl
Tutu: grandmother Tutu kane: grandfather
Brah / bruddah: brother or pal. Most men refer
to each other this way.
Broke da mout: delicious
Bumbucha: very big Chicken skin: goose bumps
Fo’ what: why Fo’ real: really
Garans: guaranteed Grind: to eat
Hana hou: one more time Hele on: let’s go, get moving
Howzit: How are you? Huhu: mad, angry
Keiki: child Kokua: care, help
Like beef?: want to fight? Lolo: dumb, crazy
Lua: bathroom Moke: big, tough local
Nevah: never Ono: delicious
Pau: finished, done Pupus: appetizers
Spahk: check it out Stink Eye: a very dirty look
Talk stink: badmouth someone Tita: a very tough girl
Tutu: grandmother Tutu kane: grandfather

Check this site out to see more examples with audio!

Here’s One Local Kine Poem

Pigin English Poem
Dere waz one ol Tutu
Stay living in one slippah
She get choke kids
Planny braddahs one sistah
She geev um lau lau
But no mo da poi
Den broke dere okoles
And sent dem moi moi

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